Second Breaks 169 Successful Aging with Dr. Mickey Barber

“If we can stay healthy and well, and avoid those diseases associated with the aging process, then our chances of being able to participate in things that we really enjoy, are so much better.” — Dr. Mickey Barber

IN THIS EPISODE:

  • Dr. Barber explains the phrase “successful aging” and how we can achieve it
  • Why it’s important to look for a physician who specializes in age management and what we should look for
  • Why she believes in a shared responsibility of the patient-doctor team
  • How to talk to our doctors to have a better chance that our health concerns are heard
  • The most important factors to staying healthy as we get older

ABOUT MY GUEST:

Dr. Mickey Barber is on a mission to spread the word that you can look and feel great at any age. Her philosophy for successful aging includes preventing age-related diseases while maintaining energy, health, and sexual vigor through the shared responsibility of the patient-doctor team.

Dr. Barber has been featured on television and in publications including Shape Magazine, Vogue, and Harpers Bazaar. She is a Maria Shriver “Architect for Change” and a sought-after lecturer on age management and hormone replacement.

In this episode, we talk about how we can successfully navigate the aging process and stay healthy as we get older – so we can continue to do and enjoy the things we want to do… and why it really is never too late to start.

MENTIONED

Learn more about Dr. Mickey Barber and her practice: Better Life Carolinas
American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine
Age Management Medical Group
The Institute For Functional Medicine
We The Women
Alliance for Pharmacy Compounding
Follow Second Breaks on Instagram
Connect with Lou Blaser on LinkedIn

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A FEW HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE CONVERSATION:

There are things that wear out. Like I have a new shoulder, I had my shoulder replaced in November. And so the more active we are, there are going to be parts that might need some work. But if you can say healthy, avoid medications and really take care of yourself, I think the likelihood that you’re going to be successful in the aging process is much better.

What I always tell patients is it’s never too early and it’s never too late to get started. And I think that’s the important thing. Even if you’re 70 and maybe you haven’t been doing everything in a healthy manner or the right way, it’s still not too late. On the other side of that coin, if you’re 30, great! Let’s get started now. I mean, you’ll be so ahead of the game. So I don’t think that there’s a right or wrong, time to get started.

First of all, your doctors should walk the walk. I mean, if they’re saying get to the gym and they look like they haven’t seen a jet. I’m out of there. I mean, that’s not the doctor for me.

What I’ve learned now is to say, “Hold on, just stop for a second. Are you telling me this is normal? A, B, C, and D. Is that what you’re telling me?” And I think it’s the patient’s responsibility to stop the conversation if it’s not going in the direction and you feel like you’re not being heard. It of course is the physician’s responsibility to hear the patient. Unfortunately, I don’t know how much of that is taught and how much of that is learned behavior.

You have to go in there with a list and don’t make it too long. Be reasonable. Prioritize. What is important to you at that point in time? And for God’s sake, don’t say “I Googled such and such”, in the conversation because that’s just not a good way to start the conversation.

Everyone’s genetics is different, but you are what you eat. That’s number one. Number two, sleep is huge — the quality of your sleep, making sure you wake up rested in the morning, making sure you have a good sleep routine is huge. I mean the quickest way to age prematurely is to be deprived of sleep.


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